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His Dark Materials (2003-2004)

His Dark Materials posterTimothy Dalton as Lord Asriel

Author: Philip Pullman Adaptation: Nicholas Wright
Producer: National Theatre Stage: Olivier Theatre, London
Director: Nicholas Hytner
Performed: Dec 5, 2003 - March 27, 2004 (circa 50 performances)

Cast
Pantalaimon - Samuel Barnett; Lord Boreal - John Carlisle; Will - Dominic Cooper; Serafina Pekkala - Niamh Cusack; Lord Asriel - Timothy Dalton; Farder Coram - Patrick Godfrey; John Faa - Stephen Grief; Billy Costa - Jamie Harding; Mrs Coulter - Patricia Hodge; Doctor Cade - Akbar Kurtha; Jopari/Iofur - Chris Larkin; Tortured Witch/Harpy - Inika Leigh Wright; Salcilia - Helena Lymbery; Fra Pavel/Lee Scoresby - Tim McMullan; Professor Hopcraft - Iain Mitchell; Lyra - Anna Maxwell Martin; Macaw Lady - Helen Murton; Stelmaria - Emily Mytton; Ruta Skadi - Cecilia Noble; Mrs Lonsdale - Katy Odey; Thorold - Nick Sampson; Iorek - Dany Sapani; Ben - Jason Thorpe; Roger - Russell Tovey; Perkins - Daniel Tuite; Astronomy Scholar/Dr West - Andrew Westfield; Brother Jasper - Ben Whishaw; Angelica - Katie Wimpenny; Golden Monkey - Ben Wright; Tony Costa - Richard Youman; all other parts played by members of the company

About
"His Dark Materials" takes us on a thrilling journey through worlds familiar and unknown. For Lyra and Will, its two central characters, it's a coming of age and a transforming spiritual experience. Their great quest demands a savage struggle against the most dangerous of enemies. They encounter fantastical creatures in parallel worlds - rebellious angels, soul-eating spectres, child-catching Gobblers and the armoured bears and witch-clans of the Arctic. Finally, before reaching, perhaps, the republic of heaven, they must visit the land of the dead.

"His Dark Materials" is an epic production both in its narrative scope and its staging, involving artists from new technologies as well as old. It is one of the National's most ambitious projects, and aims to create an experience as meaningful for 12 year olds as for adults. This riveting story unfolds over the course of two plays.

The Character
Lord Asriel is a member of the English aristocracy in a parallel universe dominated by the Church. He is described as being "a tall man with powerful shoulders, a fierce dark face, and eyes that seem to flash and glitter with savage laughter." Possessed of enormous determination and willpower, he is fierce in nature and commands great respect in both the political and academic spheres, being a military leader and a fellow of Jordan College in his world's version of the University of Oxford.

Links
A review by Debra Best (The Timothy Dalton Chat Group) and The Epic Task Of Staging Pullman By Robert Butler (courtesy of Debra Best, The Timothy Dalton Chat Group)

Star-Crossed Lovers (1999)

Star Crossed Lovers cast

About
"Star-Crossed Lovers" was a performance organized by WTTW Chicago and presented in the prestigous PBS variety series "Great Performances". Placido Domingo and Renee Fleming sang classical and popular romantic songs with Daniel Barenboim conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Timothy Dalton and Lynn Redgrave read selected verses of William Shakespeare's "Ohello" and "Romeo and Juliet" in-between musical performances. The show was recorded on January 28, 1999 and premiered on PBS on February 14, 1999. It was later re-aired on WTTW in Chicago on March 5, 1999.

Timothy Dalton was asked to take part in the venture in January 1999 through Lynn Redgrave who agreed to co-host the event a month earlier and suggested Dalton as the best possible choice to support her on stage.

The series
"Great Performances", the only continuing primetime performance showcase on American television, presents a diverse programming portfolio of classical music, opera, popular song, musical theater, dance, drama, and performance documentaries. With its programs garnering 62 Emmy Awards and four George Foster Peabody Awards, the series has received every major television honor.

Regardless of geographic or economic limitations, "Great Performances" insures its audiences "the best seats in the house" with a roster of artists and performing arts companies that represent a "Who's Who" of excellence and virtuosity in the international performing arts.

Links
A review by Fawn Ring, WTTW's Executive Producer for Cultural and Entertainment Programming (courtesy of The Timothy Dalton Chat Group).

Uncle Vanya (1996)

Cast
Vanya - Robert Stevens, Astrov - Timothy Dalton, Sonya - Brenda Blethyn, Yelena - Cheryl Campbell, The Professor - Michael Gough, The Nurse - Madoline Thomas, Telyegin - David Sinclair, Madam Voynitsky - Pauline Letts, Yefim/Labourer - Alan Dudley

About
In 1996 Timothy Dalton headlined the cast of the BBC radio adaptation of Chekov's "Uncle Vanya". The play was translated by Christopher Hampton and produced for the BBC by Jane Morgan. In addition to the BBC premiere, the recording was also aired on ABC Classic FM on 8th October 1996.

Press release: "Mention the name Chekov and people think of characters languishing in the prvinces, complaining that nothing ever happens - but in 'Uncle Vanya' there are three cases of thwarted love, a murder attempt, and a threatened suicide."

"Written in 1899, 'Uncle Vanya' is set in the country house of the emininent scholar Professor Serebryakov. The Professor returns to his house with his beautiful young second wife Yelena. The house is managed by Serebryakov's daughter Sonya, and his first wife's brother, Vanya. The frustrated “Uncle Vanya” is immediately attracted by his elegant, bored Yelena. Yelena is more interested in the sensitive doctor Astrov, who (without his realising it) is adored by Sonya. Meanwhile the Professor has decided to sell the estate."

Love Letters (1991)

Timothy Dalton and Whoopi Goldberg

Author: A. R. Gurney
Stage: Canon Theatre, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles
Director: Ted Weiant
Performed: August 3/4, 1991

Cast
Melissa Gardner - Whoopi Goldberg; Andrew Makepeace Ladd III - Timothy Dalton

About
"Love Letters", a Pulitzer Prize for Drama nominated play, was first staged in 1988. The play centers on just two characters. Using the epistolary form sometimes found in novels, they sit side by side at tables and read the notes, letters and cards - in which over nearly 50 years, they discuss their hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments, victories and defeats - that have passed between them throughout their separated lives.

Goldberg and Dalton's performances of "Love Letters", the first bi-racial adaptation of the play, were the final performances of the extended Beverly Hills run (1990-92) of Gurney's work. Like their predecessors, neither of the stars received more than $1500 a week. By tradition, rehearsal time was limited to 4 hours before curtain time plus as many additional private meetings as the actors themselves wanted to arrange. To deal with the contrasting ethnic status of Goldberg and Dalton, the couple used a variation of the adjusted script that playwright Gurney had created for such black actors as Alfred Woodward and Blair Underwood when they did "Love Letters". Tickets for the Goldberg-Dalton performances sold out with 2.5 days of the announcement of the pairing.

The Character
Andrew Makepeace Ladd III is square, destined for Yale, a naval officer, a lawyer, and a U.S. Senator, and says that "writing letters is what he loves most".

A Touch of the Poet (1988)

'A Touch of the Poet' handbill Timothy Dalton as Cornelius Melody in 'A Touch of the Poet'

Author: Eugene O'Neill
Producer: Duncan C. Weldon, Jerome Minskoff Stage: The Young Vic Theatre, Comedy Theatre, Theatre Royal Brighton, Haymarket Theatre
Director: David Thacker
Designer: Saul Radomsky
Performed: Feb 2, 1988 (The Young Vic Theatre), March 10, 1988 (Comedy Theatre)

Cast
Mickey Maloy - William Armstrong, Jamie Cregan - John McEnery, Sara Melody - Rudi Davies, Nora Melody - Vanessa Redgrave, Cornelius Melody - Timothy Dalton, Dan Roche - James Berwick, Paddy O'Dowd - Simon Coady, Patch Riley - Shay Gorman, Deborah/Mrs Henry Harford - Amanda Boxer, Nicholas Gadsby - Malcolm Tierney, Piper - John Murphy

About
"A Touch of the Poet" is a 1942 play by Eugene O'Neill. It is one of the only two surviving plays intended nine-play cycle entitled "A Tale of Possessors, Self-dispossessed". It is set in the dining room of Melody's Tavern, in a village a few miles from Boston, July 27, 1828. It focuses on the Irish immigrants to America in the 19th century and references to American politics of the period. The plot of the play is simple: the daughter of a faded nobleman tries to win the love of a rich American, yet the complexities that emerge mock this simplicity.

The Character
Cornelius "Con" Melody is the vailglorious alcoholic Irish saloon keeper living on memories of triumph in Wellington's army. He despises the Irish 'peasant' in his wife, yet speaks fondly of his youth in Ireland. Even when he is admiring his English army uniform and recounting his valour, he quotes Byron, 'among them but not of them'. Con Melody is trapped in a role he once played in real life, as a gallant major in Wellingtoní's army, now declined into a lowly Bostonian tavern-keeper. He cherishes his uniform, which comes out once a year on the anniversary of the Battle of Talavera - to the admiration of his peasant wife and the derision of his daughter Sara.

Trivia
It was the first ever staging of "A Touch of the Poet". Vanessa Redgrave won a London Critics Circle Theatre Award as the Best Supporting Actress. David Thacker, Vanessa Redgrave and Rudi Davies were also nominated for Olivier Awards, and the play got another nomination for the Kenneth Tynan Award for Outstanding Achievement.

Links
The play's entry at An Electronic Eugene O'Neill Archive's (including two "London Times" reviews).

Further reading
"Plays & Players", April 1988

The Taming of the Shrew (1986)

'The Taming Of The Shrew' and 'Antony and Cleopatra' programme Vanessa Redgrave and Timothy Dalton

Production photographs by Phil Cutts

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Triumph Apollo Productions Ltd./Theatr Clwyd Company Stage: Theatre Clwyd, Wales, then Theatre Royal Haymarket, London
Director: Toby Robertson and Christopher Selbie
Designer: Simon Higlett
Composer: Robert Stewart
Performed: June 10 (Haymarket) - July 23, 1986

Cast
Lucentio - Delaval Astley; Tranio - Sylvester McCoy; Baptista - Gerald James; Katherina - Vanessa Redgrave; Bianca - Kika Markham; Gremio - Robert O'Mahoney; Hortensio - Martin Chamberlain; Biondello - Richard Rees; Petruchio - Timothy Dalton; Grumio - Bunny May; Servant to Bianca - Madalyn Morgan; Curtis/Tailor - Christopher Bowen; Nathaniel - Steven Woodcock; Philip/Haberdasher - Andrew Lucre; Peter/A Pedant, of Mantua - Hayward Morse; Nicholas - Ben Ellison; Tailor's Model - Andrew Wheaton; Vincentio - Ken Bones; Widow - Margot Leicester.

About
"The Taming Of The Shrew" is a comedy by William Shakespeare, published in 1623. The plot depicts the courtship of Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and Katherina, the headstrong, obdurate shrew. Initially, Katherina is an unwilling participant in the relationship, but Petruchio tempers her with various psychological torments - the "taming" - until she is an obedient bride. The sub-plot features a competition between the suitors of Katherina's more tractable sister, Bianca. The play's apparent misogynistic elements have become the subject of considerable controversy, particularly among modern audiences and readers.

The Character
Petruchio is a fortune seeker who enters into a marriage with a strong-willed young woman named Kate and then proceeds to "tame" her temperamental spirit. During his first encounter with Kate, he matches her fierce temper and manages to convince her father that she passionately loves him but only pretends to hate him in public. He frightens Kate by yelling at the servants and prevents her from eating by insisting that the dishes are not good enough for her. He then offers Kate presents of dresses and jewelry, only to return them saying that they too weren't good enough. At the wedding, Petruchio is taunted by Hortensio and Lucentio for having married a "shrew". He proposes a contest to see which man has the most obedient wife: All three will call for their wives and see which ones respond. Of the three women, only Kate comes and a triumphant Petruchio is the winner.

Further reading
"Plays & Players", June 1986

Antony and Cleopatra (1986)

'The Taming Of The Shrew' and 'Antony and Cleopatra' programme Ken Bones, Kika Markham and Timothy Dalton

Production photographs by Phil Cutts

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Triumph Apollo Productions Ltd./Theatr Clwyd Company Stage: Theatre Clwyd, Wales, then Theatre Royal Haymarket, London
Director: Toby Robertson and Christopher Selbie
Designer: Simon Higlett
Composer: Robert Stewart
Performed: May 26 (Haymarket) - July 26, 1986

Cast
Mark Antony - Timothy Dalton; Octavius Caesar - Ken Bones; Lepidus/Clown - Gerald James; Domitius Enobarbus - Robert O'Mahoney; Eros - Richard Rees; Candidius/Soldier/Dolabella/Menecrates - Hayward Morse; Scarus/Alexas - Taylor McAuley; Schoolmaster/A Messenger - Ben Ellison; Maecenas - Christopher Bowen; Agrippa - Andrew Wheaton; Thidias Gallus/A Soothsayer - Bunny May; Proculeius/Varrius - Delaval Astley; Octavia, Caesar's sister - Kika Markham; Sextus Pompey - Sylvester McCoy; Menas/Diomedes/Seleucus - Martin Chamberlain; Cleopatra - Vanessa Redgrave; Charmian - Margot Leicester; Iras - Madalyn Morgan; Mardian - Steven Woodcock

About
"Antony and Cleopatra" is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, printed for the first time in 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's "Life of Marcus Antonius" and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterized by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome.

The Character
Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius) was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Julia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate. The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

Henry IV, Parts I & II (1982)

'Henry IV' RSC programme Timothy Dalton as Hotspur in 'Henry IV'

Production photographs by Chris Davies

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Royal Shakespeare Company Stage: Barbican Theatre, London, then Aldwych Theatre
Director: Trevor Nunn
Designer: John Napier
Composer: Guy Woolfenden
Performed: May 7, 1982 (Part 1), May 13, 1982 (Part 2)

Cast
Henry IV - Patrick Stewart; Sir John Falstaff - Joss Ackland, Hotspur - Timothy Dalton/Hugh Quarshie; Prince Hal - Gerald Murphy, John - Kevin Wallace; Archbishop of York - John Burgess; Justice Shallow - Robert Eddison; Doll/Lady Mortimer - Gemma Jones; Poins - Miles Anderson; Lady Percy - Harriet Walter; Pistol - Mike Gwilym; Bardolph - John Rogan; Mistress Quickly - Miriam Karlin; John of Lancaster - Kevin Wallace; Worcester - John Franklyn-Robbins; Lord Chief Justice - Griffith Jones; Scroop - John Burgess; Glendower - Bernard Lloyd; Westmoreland - Bernard Brown; Silence - David Lloyd Meredith; Blunt - Ray Jewers; Mortimer/Clarence - Simon Templeman; Francis - Dexter Fletcher; Warwick - Brian Poyser; Morton/Shadow - Philip Franks; Archibald - Ronan Wilmot; Dick - Graham Turner; Peto - James Fleet.

About
"Henry IV, Parts I & II" are two history plays by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1596 and 1599. They are the second and the third part of Shakespeare's tetralogy that deals with the successive reigns of Richard II, Henry IV (2 plays), and Henry V. "Henry IV, Part I" depicts a span of history that begins with Hotspur's battle at Homildon against the Douglas late in 1402 and ends with the defeat of the rebels at Shrewsbury in the middle of 1403. From the start it has been an extremely popular play both with the public and the critics. "Henry IV, Part II" picks up where Part One left off. Its focus is on Prince Hal's journey toward kingship, and his ultimate rejection of Falstaff. However, unlike Part One, Hal and Falstaff's stories are almost entirely separate, as the two characters meet only twice and very briefly. The tone of much of the play is elegiac, focusing on Falstaff's age and his closeness to death.

The Character
Sir Henry Percy, also called Harry Hotspur (1364/1366 - 1403) was the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Lord Percy of Alnwick. His mother was Margaret Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby and Alice de Audley. His nickname is suggestive of his impulsive nature. He is one of the leading characters of "Henry IV, Part I" which was sub-titled "With the Battle at Shrewsburie, between the King and Lord Henry Percy, surnamed Henry Hotspur of the North", and - as it's often said - the play belongs to any single actor, that actor is the one playing Hotspur. In "Henry IV, Part I" Hotspur is portrayed as being of the same age as his main rival, Prince Hal (Henry V of England), when in fact Hotspur was considerably older, Prince Henry being a teenager of 16 at the time.

Trivia
This was the first play in the then new Royal Shakespeare Company home at the Barbican. In order to take part in the production, Timothy Dalton has bowed out of the film about the legendary Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova.

Links
AHDS Arts and Humanities Data Service Photos [1], [2]

Further reading
"Plays & Players", August 1982

Shakespeare's Rome (1981)

'Antony & Cleopatra' with Carmen Du Sautoy

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Mermaid Theatre Trust Stage: Mermaid Theatre, London
Director: Bernard Miles, Ron Pember
Designer: Robin Don
Performed: October 13, 1981 (premiere)

Cast (Part 1 - "Julius Caesar")
Antony - Timothy Dalton, Cassius - Colin Bennett, Octavius - Andrew Branch, Trebonius - Fred Bryant, Metellus - Nigel Nobes, Scarus - Michael Roberts, Decius/Cicero - Aaron Shirley, Casca - Derek Ware, Cinna - Andre Winterton, Brutus - Gilbert Wynne, Caesar - Morgan Sheppard, Lepidus - Peter Welch, Flag bearers - Robbie McNab, Christopher Merrick

Cast (Part 2 - "Antony and Cleopatra")
Antony - Timothy Dalton, Cleopatra - Carmen Du Sautoy, Agrippa - Colin Bennett, Octavius - Andrew Branch, Pompey - Fred Bryant, Countryman Charmian - Karen Ford, Alexas - Nigel Nobes, Octavia - Angela Phillips, Strato - Michael Roberts, Eros - Aaron Shirley, Menas - Derek Ware, Decretas - Andre Winterton, Maecenas - Gilbert Wynne, Enobarbus - Morgan Sheppard, Iras - Gaynor Sinclair, Lepidus - Peter Welch, Flag bearers - Robbie McNab, Christopher Merrick

About
This production presented, uniquely, two great plays central to European culture, as parts I and II of a single whole.

"Antony and Cleopatra" is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, printed for the first time in 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's "Life of Marcus Antonius" and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterized by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome.

"Julius Caesar" is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599. It portrays the 44 BC conspiracy against the Roman dictator Julius Caesar, his assassination and the defeat of the conspirators at the Battle of Philippi. It is one of several Roman plays that Shakespeare wrote, based on true events from Roman history, which also include "Coriolanus" and "Antony and Cleopatra".

The Character
Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius) was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Julia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate. The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

The Vortex (1975-1976)

Vivien Merchant and Timothy Dalton in 'The Vortex'

Production photograph by Stephen Moreton Prichard

Author: NoŽl Coward
Stage: Greenwich Theatre, London
Designer: Peter Rice
Performed: 1975 (premiere), ran until 1976

Cast
Florence - Vivien Merchant, Nicky Lancaster - Timothy Dalton, Helen Saville - Jennifer Hilary, Gabrielle Drake, Alan Judd

About
"The Vortex", written in 1924, was NoŽl Coward's first great commercial success. It focuses on sexual vanity and drug abuse among the upper classes. The story follows Nicky who proposes to his lover Bunty, a journalist, while his mother Florence, an ageing socialite, has extramarital affairs with younger men, including Tom, who is also Bunty's ex-fiancť.

The Character
Nicky Lancaster is a talented composer who struggles with his severe cocaine addiction and repressed homosexuality, as well as the simmering resentment he feels for his vainglorious mother.

Trivia
In 1975 Timothy Dalton played Tom Veryan, Florence's young lover, in a BBC Radio production of "The Vortex". Read more.

Further reading
"Plays & Players", December 1975

Love's Labour's Lost (1973)

RSC poster Theatre programme

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Royal Shakespeare Company Stage: Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-Upon-Avon
Director: David Jones
Designers: Timothy O'Brien and Tazeena Firth
Composer: William Southgate
Performed: August 7, 1973 (premiere)

Cast
Berowne - Ian Richardson; Boyet - Sebastian Shaw/Patrick Godfrey; Costard - Timothy Dalton/Mike Gwilym; Armado - Tony Church; Dull - Dennis Holmes; Dumaine - Michael Ensign; Ferdinand - Bernard Lloyd/David Suchet; Forester - Gavin Campbell; Holofernes - Derek Smith/Norman Rodway; Jaquenetta - Louise Jameson; Katharine - Janet Chappell; Longaville - Robert Ashby; Maria - Catherine Kessler/Lynette Davies; Princess of France - Susan Fleetwood; Rosaline - Estelle Kohler; Sir Nathaniel - Jeffrey Dench.

About
"Love's Labour's Lost" is one of William Shakespeare's early comedies. It tells a story of the King of Navarre and three noble companions, Berowne, Dumaine, and Longaville, who after taking an oath to devote themselves to three years of study, promising not to give in to the company of women, comically fall in love with the princess and her ladies.

The Character
Costard is a comic figure who pokes fun at the upper-class. He makes many clever puns, and is used as a tool by Shakespeare to explain new words such as 'Remuneration'. He is sometimes considered one of the smartest characters in the play due to his wit and wordplay. While mocking a pedantic schoolmaster, Costard uses the word 'Honorificabilitudinitatibus', the longest word by far from any of Shakespeare's works.

Trivia
In 1975 the play was performed on a US tour. It's not confirmed whether Dalton was part of the cast by then.

Links
AHDS Arts and Humanities Data Service Photos [1]

Further reading
"Plays & Players", Oct 1973

Romeo and Juliet (1973)

'Romeo and Juliet' brochure Timothy Dalton and Estelle Kohler in 'Romeo and Juliet'

Production photographs by Frank Herrmann

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Royal Shakespeare Company Stage: Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-Upon-Avon
Director: Terry Hands
Designer: Farrah
Composer: Ian Kellam
Performed: March 26/28, 1973 (premiere)

Cast
Romeo - Timothy Dalton; Juliet - Estelle Kohler; Mercutio - Bernard Lloyd; Tybalt - David Suchet; Benvolio - Peter Machin; Nurse - Beatrix Lehmann; Friar Lawrence - Tony Church; Capulet - Jeffery Dench; Lady Capulet - Brenda Bruce; Montague - Richard Mayes; Paris - Anthony Pedley; Chorus/Prince - Clement McCallin; Lady Montague - Janet Whiteside; Peter - Brian Glover; Balthasar - Nickolas Grace; Old Capulet - Denis Holmes.

About
"Romeo and Juliet" is a tragedy written early in the career William Shakespeare about two teenage lovers whose untimely deaths ultimately unite their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with "Hamlet", is one of his most frequently performed plays.

The Character
Romeo is born into the Italian nobility - specifically, the eminent Montague clan. He has a personal servant, Balthasar, and is notably skilled with a sword and dagger. He is romantic and passionate. After finding out that Tybalt, Juliet's cousin, has killed his friend Mercutio, Romeo kills him. When he's forced to believe Juliet is dead, he resolves to commit suicide. His final words are "Thus with a kiss I die".

Trivia
The role of Tybalt was played by David Suchet, who was later to become Hercule Poirot in a popular TV series and a number of TV movies based on Agatha Christie's novels.

Links
RSC Photo Archive [1]
AHDS Arts and Humanities Data Service Photos [1]

Further reading
"Plays & Players", May 1973

Love's Labour's Lost (1972)

'King Lear & Love's Labour's Lost' brochure

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Prospect Theatre Company Stage: Ashcroft Theatre, Croydon; tour of Australia; Aldwych Theatre, London
Director: Toby Robertson
Designer: Robin Archer
Performed: March 10, 11, 1972 (Ashcroft Theatre); two-month tour of Australia (March 20-April 1, 1972; Her Mayesty's Theatre, with "King Lear"); June 5, 1972 (premiere at Aldwych Theatre; performed for two weeks); final performances in Sept 1972

Cast
Ferdinand - Mark Jones, Longaville - Christopher Burgess, Dumaine - Michael Percival, Berowne - Timothy Dalton, Dull - Trevor Martin, Costard - Michael Graham Cox, Don Adriano de Armado - John Bailey, Moth - Ian Sharp, Jaquenetta - Vivienne Martin, Princess of France - Prunella Scales, Boyet - Henry Moxon, Katherine - Jill Dixon, Maria - Sheila Ballantine, Rosaline - Delia Lindsay, A Forester - Ralph Watson, Sir Nathaniel - Ronnie Stevens, Holofernes - Timothy West, Marcade - James Snell, Attendants on the King and Princess - Tim Barker, Terence Hillyer, Richard Ommanney, Ronald SMerczek

About
"Love's Labour's Lost" is one of William Shakespeare's early comedies. It tells a story of the King of Navarre and three noble companions, Berowne, Dumaine, and Longaville, who after taking an oath to devote themselves to three years of study, promising not to give in to the company of women, comically fall in love with the princess and her ladies.

The Character
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Additional information
"King Lear" was originally presented at the 1971 Edinburgh International Festival (albeit without Timothy Dalton) before starting a national tour. "Love's Labour's Lost" opened in Stirling in October 1971 (also without Dalton), subsequently plauing in repertoire with "King Lear". After performances in Croydon, the Company went for a two-month tour of Australia, where the two productions were presented at the Adelaide Festival, Sydney and Melbourne. In June 1972 both plays had a two-week season at the Aldwych Theatre, the first time another British company has appeared at the London home of the RSC.

King Lear (1972)

'King Lear & Love's Labour's Lost' brochure Timothy Dalton as Edgar in 'King Lear'

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Prospect Theatre Company Stage: Ashcroft Theatre, Croydon; tour of Australia; Aldwych Theatre, London
Director: Toby Robertson
Designer: Robin Archer
Performed: March 7, 8, 9, 1972 (Ashcroft Theatre); two-month tour of Australia (March 20-April 1, 1972; Her Mayesty's Theatre, with "Love's Labour's Lost"); June 5, 1972 (premiere at Aldwych Theatre; performed for two weeks); final performances in Sept 1972

Cast
Earl of Kent - Trevor Martin, Earl of Gloucester - John Bailey, Edmund - Mark Jones, King Lear - Timothy West, Goneril - Sheila Ballantine, Regan - Vivienne Martin, Cordelia - Jill Dixon, Duke of Albany - Christopher Burgess, Duke of Cornwall - Ralph Watson, Duke of Burgundy - Ronald Smerczak, King of France/Curan - James Snell, Edgar - Timothy Dalton, Oswald - Michael Graham Cox, Knight/Old Man/Doctor - Henry Moxon, Lear's Fool - Ronnie Stevens, Gentleman - Michael Percival, Servants to Gloucester - Tim Barker, Terence Hillyer, Kit Jackson, Richard Ommanney, Ian Sharp, Ronald Smerczak, Messenger - Kit Jackson, A Captain - Ronald Smerczak

About
"King Lear", a tragedy by William Shakespeare, is based on the legend of Leir of Britain, a mythological pre-Roman Celtic king. The play, available in two distinct versions, is particularly noted for its probing observations on the nature of human suffering and kinship. Since the 19th century it has been regarded as one of Shakespeare's supreme achievements.

The Character
Edgar, son of Earl of Gloucester, is a victim of his bastard brother's plot to supplant him. After he is disinhertited and proclaimed an outlaw by Gloucester, Edgar runs to the forest and lives there disguised as a madman. The character of Edgar is crucial to the finale of the play as he is later encountered by both Lear and Gloucester.

Additional information
"King Lear" was originally presented at the 1971 Edinburgh International Festival (albeit without Timothy Dalton) before starting a national tour. "Love's Labour's Lost" opened in Stirling in October 1971 (also without Dalton), subsequently plauing in repertoire with "King Lear". After performances in Croydon, the Company went for a two-month tour of Australia, where the two productions were presented at the Adelaide Festival, Sydney and Melbourne. In June 1972 both plays had a two-week season at the Aldwych Theatre, the first time another British company has appeared at the London home of the RSC.

Further reading
"Plays & Players", September 1972

The Samaritan (1971)

'The Samaritan' brochure

Author: Peter Terson in collaboration with Michael Butler
Producer: Dolphin Theatre Company Stage: Victoria Theatre, Stoke-on-Trent; Shaw Theatre, London
Director: Ron Daniels
Designer: Christopher Lawrence
Performed: May 1971 (premiere at Victoria Theatre)

Cast
Bob - Timothy Dalton, Godfrey - Richard Moore, Denny - David Cook, A Volunteer - Myra Francis, A Man - Alex Leppard

About
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The Character
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The Tragedy of Macbeth (1971)

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: The University Theatre Stage: The Kennedy Theater, Hawaii, USA
Director: Terence Knapp
Designer: Richard Mason
Performed: January 29, 30, 32, February 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1971

Cast
Duncan - Don Lev, Malcolm - Michael Kolba, Donalbain - Timothy Robinson, Macbeth - Timothy Dalton, Banquo - Michael Medeiros, Macduff - Mel Cobb, Lennox - Stephen Matthews, Ross - Gary Francis, Angus - Paul Cornwall, Caithness - John Myers, Fleance - Steve Kurtz, Old Siward - William Miretti, Young Siward - William Witter, Seyton - Dan Maloney, Son of Macduff - Gilbert Schaeffer, Doctor - Christopher Parsons, Porter - Gerald Goulet, An old man - Hal Finlay, A murderer - James Benton, A second murderer - William Soares, A wounded captain - Craig Emberson, A messenger - Alan Zimmerman, A second messenger - Rod Pinks, The weird sisters - Marcia Merkle, Sandra Puerta, Anton Haas, Hecate - Min Soo Ahn, Gentlewoman - Valerie Charles, Ladies in waiting - Sun Hi Shin, Bonita Strothman, Nancy Ward, Lady Macduff - Erica Galper, Lady Macbeth - Genevieve Nelson/Juliet Plachcinska

About
"The Tragedy of Macbeth", Shakespeare's shortest tragedy, is a play about a regicide and its aftermath. The source for the play are the accounts of King Macbeth of Scotland, Macduff, and Duncan in "Holinshed's Chronicles", a history of England, Scotland and Ireland familiar to Shakespeare and his contemporaries. However, the story of Macbeth as told by Shakespeare bears little relation to real events in Scottish history, as Macbeth was an admired and able monarch.

The Character
Macbeth, the central protagonist of the play, is a Scottish noble and a valiant military man. He is portrayed throughout the play as an antagonistic anti-hero. After a supernatural prophecy, and at the urging of his wife, Lady Macbeth, he commits regicide and becomes King of Scotland. He thereafter lives in anxiety and fear, unable to rest or to trust his nobles. He leads a reign of terror until defeated by Macduff. The throne is then restored to the rightful heir, the murdered King Duncan's son, Malcolm.

Henry V (1969)

'Henry V' leaflet

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer: Lyric Hammersmith Company Stage: Wimbledon Theatre, London; Theatre Royal, Bath
Director: Michael Meacham
Designer: Robin Pidcock
Performed: For a week, commencing Oct 6, 1969 (Wimbledon)

Cast
Henry V - James Fox, Chorus - Timothy Dalton, Sir Thomas/John Bates - David Austin, Richard, Earl of Cambridge - Peter Gidwin, Pistol - Rio Fanning, Nym/Michael Williams - Michael Gwilym, Montjoy - David Neal, Lord Scroop/Monsieur Le Fer - Sylvester Morand, Lewis the Dauphin/Duke of Burgundy -Terence Knapp, Katherine - Jill Dixon, Isabel, Queen of France - Anne Kidd, Hostess of Eastcheap Tavern/Alice - Phillada Sewell, Alexander Court - Paul Cresswell, Archbishop of Canterbury/Captain Fluellen - Colin Farrell, Bardoplh/Duke of Orleans - Bernard Hopkins, Bishop of Ely/Captain Macmorris - Walter McMonagle, Boy - Malcolm Mackintosh, Captain Gower - Michael Keating, Charles VI - Robert Lankesheer, Constable of France - Ian White, Duke of Exeter - Louis Haslar, Duke of Gloucester - Christopher Mathews, Earl of Warwick/Sir Thomas Erpingham - Stephen Bradley, Earl of Westmoreland - Alan Mitchell

About
"Henry V", a William Shakespeare play, tells the story of King Henry V of England, focusing on events immediately before and after the Battle of Agincourt (1415) during the Hundred Years' War. The play is the final part of a tetralogy, preceded by "Richard II", "Henry IV, part 1" and "Henry IV, part 2". The original audiences would thus have already been familiar with the title character, who was depicted in the "Henry IV" plays as a wild, undisciplined lad known as "Prince Hal." In "Henry V", the young prince has become a mature man and embarks on a successful conquest of France.

The Character
In Elizabethan drama, the Chorus is usually a single actor who recites the play's prologue and epilogue, apologizing for any defects the play might have and begging the audience's forbearance; sometimes the Chorus also fills in details that cannot be presented onstage and comments on the action of the play. In "Henry V", the Chorus presents not only the Prologue and Epilogue but introduces Acts II, III, IV, and V as well, so that the Chorus appears six times in the play.

Richard II (1967)

'Richard II' brochure

Author: William Shakespeare
Producer/Stage: The Birmingham Repertory Theatre
Director: Peter Dews
Designer: Trevor Pitt
Performed: March 15 - April 24, 1967

Cast
King Richard II - Henry Knowles, John of Gaunt/Earl of Salisbury/Keeper - Oliver Ford, Henry Bolingbroke - Brian Cox, Thomas Mowbray/Bishop of Carlisle - Peter Brookes, Duchess of Gloster - Alison Key, Lord Marshal/Sir Stephen Scrope - Paul Robert, Duke of Aumerle - Roy Herrick, Herald to Bolingbroke/Servant to York/Welsh Captain/Servant to Gardener - David Fennell, Herald to Mowbray/Hotspur - Timothy Dalton, Sir Henry Greene/Sir Piers of Exton - Richard Franklin, Sir John Bushy/Gardener - Colin Farrell, Sir John Bagot/Servant to Exton - David Stockton, Edmund of Langley - Stephen Hancock, Queen Isabel - Ann Penfold, Henry Percy - Graham Weston, Lord Ross - Paul Chapman, Lord Willoughby - Kiffer Weisselberg, Lord Berkeley/Servant to Gardener - Anthony King, Ladies Attendant on the Queen - Charlotte Howard, Alison Key, Guards/Soldiers/Servants, etc. - Anthony King, Anthony McEwan, Chris Daniels, David Fennell, David Stockton, David Somers, Timothy Dalton, Jonathan Mallard

About
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The Character
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